Grad academic success workshops



Conducting research


This workshop aims to ensure that participants do not miss out on the little-known research tools and tricks which can be indispensable for effective graduate level research at Concordia in all subject areas. We will cover essentials such as:
1. Pinpointing the best spots on the library web site for graduate students

2. Discovering services, resources and perks reserved for grad students only

3. Knowing when and how to seek in-depth assistance from Concordia subject specialists

4. Using specialized and subject-specific resources

5. Optimizing access to Concordia resources from on and off campus

6. Efficiently accessing material within and beyond Concordia

Participant questions and input will be invited throughout the session.
 
  • 23 May
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Getting published is one of your goals as a scholar but understanding the process of getting published in not intuitive. How do you pick a journal? How do you collaborate with co-authors? When are you ready to submit? After submission, how do you respond to feedback?

This workshop provides insight into the world of professional, peer-reviewed publications. We start by exploring the considerations you should take when choosing a journal and submitting your paper. We then discuss the peer-review process and responding to feedback in a professional manner. You will have the opportunity to critique real-life examples of journals, reviewer feedback and author responses.

 
  • 21 May
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
What do you do during a poster session?  What makes for a successful academic poster?  Maybe you have been doing research for a long time and don’t know how to condense it.  Maybe you are new to the research world, and you doubt that you have enough done to present.  In this workshop, we discuss the academic poster session, how to design a poster, and provide some tips for shining as you present your poster.
  • 07 June
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online
In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to use Zotero, a desktop and web-based tool that you can use to organize the references you find in library catalogues and databases, insert citations in your papers, and prepare bibliographies or reference lists quickly and effectively, in a wide variety of citation styles (e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago, et cetera). We will look at integrating Zotero with Microsoft Word, LibreOffice, and Google Docs. We will also cover how to share folders and citations (e.g., for collaborative projects or to disseminate reading lists). No experience with Zotero is necessary.

Please ensure that you set up Zotero in advance of the workshop. You can find instructions on how to set up Zotero on the Library website: https://library.concordia.ca/help/workshops/zotero-prerequisites.pdf

 
  • 03 June
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Sir George Williams
In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to use Zotero, a desktop and web-based tool that you can use to organize the references you find in library catalogues and databases, insert citations in your papers, and prepare bibliographies or reference lists quickly and effectively, in a wide variety of citation styles (e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago, et cetera). We will look at integrating Zotero with Microsoft Word, LibreOffice, and Google Docs. We will also cover how to share folders and citations (e.g., for collaborative projects or to disseminate reading lists). No experience with Zotero is necessary.

Please ensure that you set up Zotero in advance of the workshop. You can find instructions on how to set up Zotero on the Library website: https://library.concordia.ca/help/workshops/zotero-prerequisites.pdf

 
  • 15 May
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Online

Ethics, rights and responsibilities


Improve your understanding of the basic rules for documentation including an introduction to multiple styles. Also, learn when and how to quote or paraphrase. Understand the Academic Code of Conduct and your responsibilities as a graduate a student.
 
  • 23 May
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Are you worried about unintentionally committing an Academic Offence? Do you want to avoid being expelled and ensure you are submitting work that fairly demonstrates your own competence? Learn everything you will need to know about the Academic Code of Conduct, various offenses, and sanctions while completing specialized activities at this workshop.
 
  • 29 May
  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Online

Funding and awards


This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

There are many elements that need to be compiled before a complete scholarship application can be submitted. While many statements are written by the applicant, time is also required for 1) peer-review of those statements, 2) ordering official transcripts, 3) letters of support, and so on. The aim of this workshop is to present possible timelines that will help to anticipate the needs of most tri-agency and FRQ applications - due in the coming weeks and months - and to learn how to write a successful application, showcase your strengths, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.

Note: Students are ultimately still responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out on by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select.

 
  • 07 August
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

Funding and awards


This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Writing strategies and tips can often be applied globally, so this workshop aims to offer ways that graduate students can develop and improve their scholarship applications. For example, this workshop will offer writing tips to aid in the development of many standard and essential sections of the application (e.g. outline of proposed research, and other applicant statements). Funding agencies typically expect students to be the author of their own applications, but this does not mean writing in isolation – and does not exclude the important contributions and feedback of peers, research supervisors and other mentors.
  • 04 June
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
There are numerous funding programs available to graduate students who are undertaking academic research and working towards a thesis. This workshop will introduce the scholarship programs and funding agencies available to Concordia graduate students.

There will be an overview of the major federal and provincial funding agencies that provide research scholarships in the social sciences and humanities (SSHRC, FRQSC), Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSERC, FRQNT), and health (CIHR, FRQS). Students will be oriented to the 1) research areas and programs that each of these agencies support, 2) eligibility criteria, 3) funding cycles, and 4) basic elements of an application. In addition, the session will explain specific funding programs that require institutional pre-selection/nomination such as the PBEEE (under the FRQ), and the prestigious Vanier scholarship program (tri-agency).

The workshop leaders will also speak to the conference, research travel funds and mobility awards that are accessible through Concordia International and the School of Graduate Studies. Complementary information sessions about studying abroad on exchange are offered regularly by Concordia International.

Note: Students are ultimately responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select.

 
  • 19 June
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Research proposals vary tremendously between departments, research areas, and individuals, but there are also standard ways to present this material for each agency and scholarship program. Most fundamentally, this requires that all applicants read the program instructions carefully for the drafts they are creating. In this workshop, you will learn how to understand the main elements of an application and their relevance, write a successful application, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.
 
  • 10 July
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Research proposals vary tremendously between departments, research areas, and individuals, but there are also standard ways to present this material for each agency and scholarship program. Most fundamentally, this requires that all applicants read the program instructions carefully for the drafts they are creating. In this workshop, you will learn how to understand the main elements of an application and their relevance, write a successful application, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.

 
  • 09 July
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

There are many elements that need to be compiled before a complete scholarship application can be submitted. While many statements are written by the applicant, time is also required for 1) peer-review of those statements, 2) ordering official transcripts, 3) letters of support, and so on. The aim of this workshop is to present possible timelines that will help to anticipate the needs of most tri-agency and FRQ applications - due in the coming weeks and months - 
and to learn how to write a successful application, showcase your strengths, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.
  • 06 August
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

Join us for an informative session on applying to the prestigious Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship (Vanier CGS). Designed for prospective and first year doctoral students, this session will provide invaluable insights into the application process, eligibility criteria, and tips for crafting a compelling application package. 

The Vanier CGS program aims to attract and retain world-class doctoral students by supporting candidates who demonstrate both leadership skills and a high standard of scholarly achievement in graduate studies in the social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and/or engineering and health. 

We will guide you through the key components of the Vanier CGS application, including the research proposal, leadership and community engagement, academic achievements, and letters of recommendation. Learn how to effectively showcase your academic excellence, research potential, and leadership skills to increase your chances of success.

  • 11 June
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

Intended for current or future international students in research-based graduate programs, this workshop provides comprehensive guidance to understand the Canadian funding landscape. Participants will gain insights into the intricacies of proposal development, navigating application requirements, and optimizing their chances of securing external funding.  

This session covers every aspect of the application journey, from understanding eligibility criteria and program requirements to crafting a standout research proposal and preparing a compelling CV. Participants will gain valuable tips on how to effectively highlight their academic achievements, research potential, and leadership abilities, aligning their application with the evaluation criteria of the selection committees.  

Note: Students are still ultimately responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they ultimately select. 

  • 25 June
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.  

Whether you are applying for Tri-Agency or FRQ awards, you might be required to write statements highlighting your academic journey, research experience or personal background. In this workshop, participants will learn to craft compelling narratives that showcase their strengths and get insight into the nuances of effective storytelling, honing their abilities to articulate their motivations, achievements, and future aspirations; skills and strategies necessary to stand out in competitive funding.  

Note: Students are ultimately still responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out on by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select. 

  • 21 August
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Oral presentation skills are essential for every graduate student to successfully convey key aspects of their work in class, at academic conferences, and to potential employers.

This workshop outlines key elements that contribute to effective presentations, including preparation, structure, and delivery. We will discuss how to construct a presentation, as well as select appropriate visual aids, and discuss strategies for delivering a presentation in an engaging manner. The information covered in this workshop applies to both in-person and virtual environments including tips for a professional presentation in a home office setting and effective virtual engagement tools.

The one-time workshop is composed of two main parts: theory and practice. Theory on the essentials of graduate presentation skills will first be presented as students construct a brief presentation in parallel. The theory portion of the workshop will then be followed by an optional opportunity for participants to deliver their constructed, 3-minute presentation among peers, as well as give and receive feedback to each other and from the workshop leader.
  • 14 May
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online

Organisation and time management


Do you wish the process of writing your thesis or next research paper was going a little faster? Do you sometimes feel unfocused, frustrated or alone in the writing process?  You probably need a boost... to be more precise, a thesis boost.

Concordia’s 3-day Thesis Boost Writing Retreat is back at Loyola Campus in May 2024.  This much-appreciated retreat is tailored for graduate students who are in the middle to later stages of preparing their thesis or writing an academic article. Bringing together advisors from the Library, Student Success Centre, Campus Wellness, and GradProSkills, this retreat provides a supportive and motivating environment where you will accelerate your writing process.

Throughout the retreat, you'll benefit from dedicated writing time and optional workshops focused on improving your writing strategies, productivity and wellness. Concordia University’s librarians and writing assistants will be available to provide personalized guidance and strategies tailored to your specific situation. Plus, you’ll connect with peers who are experiencing similar challenges.

Join us to break free from isolation, connect with fellow graduate students, and develop productive writing habits. Take a significant step towards completing your thesis!

 
IMPORTANT NOTE: Participants should have begun writing their thesis or paper before participating in this event.
 
  • 29 May - 31 May
  • 09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
  • Loyola
What does it mean to be a leader? This seminar introduces you to the process of leadership and the vast array of skills needed to be a leader in a variety of contexts. We will cover the fundamental skills that will shape your leadership style, including emotional intelligence, team dynamics, negotiating, solving problems, motivating others, giving feedback and intercultural communication.

The workshop series covers different modules that span over seven sessions where you must commit approximately 3.5 hours per week. Activities include working through case studies, role-plays, group discussions, and self-reflection. Upon completion of this series, you will receive a certificate and a personal plan for your leadership development.
  • 05 July - 16 August
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams

Preparing a thesis or research paper


Before you can write a successful paper, literature review, thesis, or any other academic work, you have to learn how to perfect the paragraph. Adopting the strategies for creating cohesive ideas, impactful statements, and a logical flow is crucial to any academic writing career.

Applicable to graduate-level writers of all backgrounds, the Perfecting the Paragraph workshop aims to provide participants with an understanding of the most common mistakes that lead to unconvincing, unclear writing. Taking the paragraph as an “idea” unit, the workshop looks at the formulation and purpose of the topic sentence. It then focuses on paragraph structure, development of the main idea, transition to the next paragraph, punctuation, style, and vocabulary.

This workshop is particularly useful for non-native English speakers. Please note that this workshop focuses on basic elements and tips important for academic paragraph writing.

This workshop is divided in three segments. The first segment will present the basic elements of an academic paragraph. The second segment will overview useful tips and resources to keep in mind while writing. In the third segment, participants will review a writing sample as part of a peer-reviewing exercise. In a supportive environment, the instructor and participants will provide feedback on randomly assigned, anonymous writing samples based on the information presented in the previous two segments. Since writing samples are anonymous, participants are highly encouraged to submit their own writing samples to be peer-reviewed during this segment.

 
  • 04 June
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Your graduate thesis is one of the ways that Concordia fulfills its mission to create and disseminate knowledge. As an official Concordia document, your thesis needs to meet certain requirements.

If you are a masters or doctoral student in the early or middle stages of drafting your thesis, this workshop is for you. This workshop will review the who’s who of thesis submission, the different kinds of theses (research creation, manuscript-based, traditional), and the differing requirements needed to submit. The workshop will also cover the important deadlines and procedures for thesis submission and graduation. Participants will be able to begin planning their own thesis timeline and submission plan during the workshop.

 
  • 29 May
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Loyola
This workshop will focus on resolving the most common problems encountered with articulating a clear and effective thesis statement. It will guide students through editing strategies for turning static theses into arguments that respond dynamically to the evidence and engage the reader. This workshop will also distinguish thesis statements from other elements of the introduction paragraph.

This workshop will instruct students in the “evolving thesis” model of paper writing and research. Additionally, participants will have the chance to write their own thesis statements and introductions, and will spend a portion of the workshop working on their own material and providing feedback to one another.

Participants are encouraged to have ready a draft of an introduction of their own writing during the workshop.
 
  • 16 May
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop will define the various elements that comprise a literature review and provide practical strategies for students in the process of completing a literature review for coursework. Specific topics that are covered include identifying scholarly literature, creating and following a research plan, and assessing the usefulness of texts for your literature reviews.

Students will also have the opportunity to read and examine samples of literature reviews from completed dissertations and critique them with their peers.

 
  • 28 May
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Abstracts are a crucial part of the majority of academic writing. Being able to compose a concise, accurate, and attractive abstract is an essential skill for graduate students. Abstracts allow you to promote your work to a broader audience by making it easier for others to understand your work, and by increasing your chances of successful conference and journal submissions.

This workshop presents information to help you understand the contents and purpose of abstracts and essential writing strategies for crafting a summary of your work in the abstract format. The workshop includes activities that allow students to acquire writing strategies in an interactive environment, benefitting from peer feedback on their work.

 
  • 14 June
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online

Conducting research


This workshop aims to ensure that participants do not miss out on the little-known research tools and tricks which can be indispensable for effective graduate level research at Concordia in all subject areas. We will cover essentials such as:
1. Pinpointing the best spots on the library web site for graduate students

2. Discovering services, resources and perks reserved for grad students only

3. Knowing when and how to seek in-depth assistance from Concordia subject specialists

4. Using specialized and subject-specific resources

5. Optimizing access to Concordia resources from on and off campus

6. Efficiently accessing material within and beyond Concordia

Participant questions and input will be invited throughout the session.
 
  • 18 January
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Getting published is one of your goals as a scholar but understanding the process of getting published in not intuitive. How do you pick a journal? How do you collaborate with co-authors? When are you ready to submit? After submission, how do you respond to feedback?

This workshop provides insight into the world of professional, peer-reviewed publications. We start by exploring the considerations you should take when choosing a journal and submitting your paper. We then discuss the peer-review process and responding to feedback in a professional manner. You will have the opportunity to critique real-life examples of journals, reviewer feedback and author responses.

 
  • 16 January
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop will guide participants through the first steps of doing data analysis, specifically text mining with Weka.
 
Weka is an open-source machine-learning tool. We will be replicating the work of Mike Thelwall in his paper on Gender bias in machine learning for sentiment analysis.

Before getting into the hands-on text mining exercise, we will present a brief introduction to AI and machine learning, as well as the notion of algorithmic bias; what it is, how is introduced, and its repercussions.

By the end of the workshop participants will have applied a sentiment analysis technique to a gender-segregated data set and be able to determine its effect on the resulting predictive model.
 
  • 08 November
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
What do you do during a poster session?  What makes for a successful academic poster?  Maybe you have been doing research for a long time and don’t know how to condense it.  Maybe you are new to the research world, and you doubt that you have enough done to present.  In this workshop, we discuss the academic poster session, how to design a poster, and provide some tips for shining as you present your poster.
  • 05 March
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online
This hands-on workshop will introduce students to the modern, no-cost, digital note-taking tool, Obsidian (or Zettlr). Integrated with Zotero and used in an academic framework, these tools can foster productive research writing. The workshop will help students start practising the principles of a Zettelkasten technique to build a personal knowledge base of literature notes, interlinked ideas, long-form writing, visual concept maps, and more. It will show how to associate Obsidian notes with bibliographic information in Zotero as part of the research writing workflow. 
  • 09 February
  • 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Sir George Williams
Are you comfortable using Zotero but feel like you might not be getting the most out of it? This workshop is designed for people that would like to discover some tricks for working with Zotero. We will take a hands-on approach, so please bring your computer already configured for using Zotero.
  • 19 March
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Sir George Williams
Do you have data you'd like to analyze? Would you like to gain insights from your data and communicate them with eye-catching visualizations and reports? Are you tired of being chained to Excel or expensive proprietary software? If the answer to any of these questions is "Yes!", then this workshop is for you. R is an open-source and versatile programming language that's perfect for data analysis, visualization, and science communication.

In this all-in-one course, you'll learn the basics of programming and be introduced to the RStudio interface. We'll then move on to how to import and clean data, how to make publication-quality plots and visualizations, and how to generate scientific reports to communicate your findings; all within the R ecosystem!

In this three-part interactive workshop, you'll learn to:
• Import CSV and Excel files
• Install and use external packages
• Clean and explore data
• Generate descriptive statistics
• Create and customize plots
• Write custom functions

All of this is done with principles of reproducibility in mind, so you can write code that is clear and easily shareable with others. No previous coding experience is necessary. R is used in fields ranging from linguistics and marketing to ecology and sports analytics and many more. If you want the ability to get more out of your data, join us to get started using R.
  • 13 June - 27 June
  • 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
Primary sources are original documents and objects that were created at the time under study, or by participants or observers of the events. Suited for students who need to incorporate historical resources into their research, this workshop offers an introduction to finding sometimes elusive primary sources appropriate for graduate study. Students will learn how to identify and retrieve original documents in a variety of formats at Concordia Library and beyond. You will learn the relevant skills necessary to find, evaluate, and cite primary sources.
 
  • 09 March
  • 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
  • Online
OpenRefine is a powerful, free tool that simplifies working with messy data. During this workshop, attendees will learn how OpenRefine can be used to clean and normalize data sets, reorder columns, filter data, and transform data sets into different file types.
 
  • 12 October
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Sir George Williams
In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to use Zotero, a desktop and web-based tool that you can use to organize the references you find in library catalogues and databases, insert citations in your papers, and prepare bibliographies or reference lists quickly and effectively, in a wide variety of citation styles (e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago, et cetera). We will look at integrating Zotero with Microsoft Word, LibreOffice, and Google Docs. We will also cover how to share folders and citations (e.g., for collaborative projects or to disseminate reading lists). No experience with Zotero is necessary.

Please ensure that you set up Zotero in advance of the workshop. You can find instructions on how to set up Zotero on the Library website: https://library.concordia.ca/help/workshops/zotero-prerequisites.pdf

 
  • 20 February
  • 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This is an introductory workshop for students in all disciplines who wish to better understand and include Indigenous perspectives in their research. The workshop will briefly situate the university library within settler colonialism in Canada, provide context to current research on indigenous topics and include discussions around the limits of terminology and subject classification. The instructors will guide students to recommended resources for Indigenous topics and provide an overview of research ethics guidelines.
 
  • 13 February
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Would you like to be able to keep a permanent copy of something that's online? Whether it's your thesis project website, source material for your research, or your favourite cat video, online content is at high risk of disappearing. This workshop will show you how to preserve web content using free and open-source tools.  This is an introductory-level workshop and no prior knowledge or technical skills are needed.
  • 04 October
  • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Online
This workshop will focus on the main sources of social statistics in Canada, namely Statistics Canada's Website, more specifically the Data section and the Canadian Census. Provincial statistics (Institut de la Statistique du Québec) will also be mentioned. The second part of the presentation will present the concept of microdata and introduce students to data available through the Data Liberation Initiative (DLI). We will review the best methods to identify relevant surveys. The various types of data files (PUMFs, Master Files) will be described and students will be shown how to access those files via the Odesi database or by going to the Research Data Centre at McGill (QICSS). There will be a demonstration of Odesi which will focus on searching the platform for surveys and individual variables and on downloading datasets and associated documentation.
  • 26 September
  • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams

Ethics, rights and responsibilities


Explore the "Ethical Use of AI in Academic Writing" during an interactive, 2-hour in-person session. Learn the benefits of using generative AI and enhance your academic writing while upholding academic integrity. Engage with case studies and discover strategies for the proper integration of these amazing and powerful tools. (Note: This workshop description was created using Chat GPT)
  • 07 March
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Beyond journal articles, there are other information sources that may be useful for your engineering design project, such as standards and codes, technical reports and white papers, and patents and trademarks. In this workshop, we will look at the characteristics of these technical sources in order to better navigate them when searching and discovering information for your design. There will be discussions about the nature of scholarly sources and the basics of intellectual property. You will get to try out relevant library databases (e.g. CSA OnDemand) and free online tools (e.g. Google Patents) that help you access technical information. This workshop should be of interest to students in engineering and computer science, but all are welcome. 
  • 07 November
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Improve your understanding of the basic rules for documentation including an introduction to multiple styles. Also, learn when and how to quote or paraphrase. Understand the Academic Code of Conduct and your responsibilities as a graduate a student.
 
  • 20 March
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
Are you worried about unintentionally committing an Academic Offence? Do you want to avoid being expelled and ensure you are submitting work that fairly demonstrates your own competence? Learn everything you will need to know about the Academic Code of Conduct, various offenses, and sanctions while completing specialized activities at this workshop.
 
  • 05 April
  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Online
Learn the basics about patents and how to search for them. Patents are a form of intellectual property for protecting inventions. This workshop is aimed at providing a general overview of intellectual property and patents. What purpose do they serve? What does a patent look like? Where to search for patents? How does one file for a patent in Canada? This is an introductory session, as such, does not provide any specific advice on patent filing. 

Join us in-person at the Visualization Studio of the Webster Library (LB-314) for an immersive experience using the interactive 9 metre display wall. Otherwise, you can also join online via Zoom. 
  • 03 April
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

There are many elements that need to be compiled before a complete scholarship application can be submitted. While many statements are written by the applicant, time is also required for 1) peer-review of those statements, 2) ordering official transcripts, 3) letters of support, and so on. The aim of this workshop is to present possible timelines that will help to anticipate the needs of most tri-agency and FRQ applications - due in the coming weeks and months - and to learn how to write a successful application, showcase your strengths, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.

Note: Students are ultimately still responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out on by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select.

 
  • 08 August
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Are you seeking to expand your professional network, develop a research partnership or land an internship? Join us to learn more about Mitacs graduate research funding programs and how they can help you carve out your career path.

This workshop will present an overview of the industrial research landscape in Montreal, Quebec and Canada. Participants will learn how to identify a potential employer or research partner, and develop strategies to approach a company for an internship or partnership.

Mitacs builds partnerships between academia, industry and the world to create a more innovative Canada. Through unique research funding and training programs, Mitacs aims to support the development of the next generation of innovators with vital scientific and business skills.

This workshop provides an overview of the Mitacs Accelerate, Elevate, Globalink, Step and Converge programs. It also outlines basic techniques for identifying and reaching out to industry partners.

 
  • 26 January
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Writing strategies and tips can often be applied globally, so this workshop aims to offer ways that graduate students can develop and improve their scholarship applications. For example, this workshop will offer writing tips to aid in the development of many standard and essential sections of the application (e.g. outline of proposed research, and other applicant statements). Funding agencies typically expect students to be the author of their own applications, but this does not mean writing in isolation – and does not exclude the important contributions and feedback of peers, research supervisors and other mentors.
  • 08 June
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
During this workshop, specifically developed to those that work on a Social Sciences and Humanities field, you will have the opportunity to receive valuable feedback on your writing by bringing your own draft for others in the session to review and provide constructive criticism. This collaborative approach will allow you to benefit from the diverse perspectives and expertise of your peers, helping you to refine and improve your writing skills in a supportive and engaging environment. So, come prepared with your work and an open mind, and let's work together to make your writing shine!
  • 13 September
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
During this workshop, specifically developed to those that work on a Health or Natural Sciences and Engineering fields, you will have the opportunity to receive valuable feedback on your writing by bringing your own draft for others in the session to review and provide constructive criticism. This collaborative approach will allow you to benefit from the diverse perspectives and expertise of your peers, helping you to refine and improve your writing skills in a supportive and engaging environment. So, come prepared with your work and an open mind, and let's work together to make your writing shine!
  • 14 September
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Are you planning on applying for future scholarships or awards? Is a deadline fast approaching? You don’t even know how to start writing your research proposal? This workshop is for you!

Aside from the purely financial benefit of receiving a scholarship, awards also serve to recognize your achievements and focus more on your studies and your research. In this workshop, you will learn how to write a successful application, showcase your strengths, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.x
  • 12 March
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
The scholarship is only open to Canadian citizens and permanent residents
 
This information session will explain the application process for the CGS M scholarship program and will provide an overview of program eligibility and application requirements. This session is intended for first year master’s students / final year undergrad students in or planning to apply to research/thesis-based programs.
 
If you are an undergraduate student interested in joining this workshop, please email gradproskills@concordia.ca to register.
  • 19 October
  • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Online
There are numerous funding programs available to graduate students who are undertaking academic research and working towards a thesis. This workshop will introduce the scholarship programs and funding agencies available to Concordia graduate students.

There will be an overview of the major federal and provincial funding agencies that provide research scholarships in the social sciences and humanities (SSHRC, FRQSC), Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSERC, FRQNT), and health (CIHR, FRQS). Students will be oriented to the 1) research areas and programs that each of these agencies support, 2) eligibility criteria, 3) funding cycles, and 4) basic elements of an application. In addition, the session will explain specific funding programs that require institutional pre-selection/nomination such as the PBEEE (under the FRQ), and the prestigious Vanier scholarship program (tri-agency).

The workshop leaders will also speak to the conference, research travel funds and mobility awards that are accessible through Concordia International and the School of Graduate Studies. Complementary information sessions about studying abroad on exchange are offered regularly by Concordia International.

Note: Students are ultimately responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select.

 
  • 06 September
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Research proposals vary tremendously between departments, research areas, and individuals, but there are also standard ways to present this material for each agency and scholarship program. Most fundamentally, this requires that all applicants read the program instructions carefully for the drafts they are creating. In this workshop, you will learn how to understand the main elements of an application and their relevance, write a successful application, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.
 
  • 13 July
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Research proposals vary tremendously between departments, research areas, and individuals, but there are also standard ways to present this material for each agency and scholarship program. Most fundamentally, this requires that all applicants read the program instructions carefully for the drafts they are creating. In this workshop, you will learn how to understand the main elements of an application and their relevance, write a successful application, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.

 
  • 06 July
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

There are many elements that need to be compiled before a complete scholarship application can be submitted. While many statements are written by the applicant, time is also required for 1) peer-review of those statements, 2) ordering official transcripts, 3) letters of support, and so on. The aim of this workshop is to present possible timelines that will help to anticipate the needs of most tri-agency and FRQ applications - due in the coming weeks and months - 
and to learn how to write a successful application, showcase your strengths, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.
  • 03 August
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

This is a live Q&A session moderated by a representative from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). Students will have the opportunity to ask specific questions about the NSERC doctoral (CGS D/PGS D) and postdoctoral (PDF) programs, whose application deadline dates are imminent.

  • 14 September
  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Online

Knowledge and research dissemination


The publication of research is a fundamental part of scholarly activity in humanities and social sciences disciplines but the publication process can seem somewhat daunting to first-time authors. How do authors approach publishers and share their work? How do authors choose publishers? What are publishers’ expectations of their authors? This workshop will discuss differences among scholarly book publishers and key areas of collaboration between authors and scholarly publishers such as book proposals, transforming dissertation research into publications, approaches to scholarly writing, and peer review.
  • 23 January
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

Knowledge and research dissemination


This workshop aims to lessen the experience of information overload by focusing on the information search process from a holistic perspective.
Some of the techniques and strategies that will be explored include concept mapping to make connections and identify gaps in your current research, search techniques like citation searching and bibliometric tools, and browsable resources at Concordia like BrowZine and Sofia. We will also discuss ways of managing information overload such as research logs, search alerts, and literature matrices.  
  • 16 February
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Online
When someone looks you up online: what do they see? How will future employers learn about your accomplishments? While taking inspiration from outstanding researcher profiles, this workshop is designed for graduate students across disciplines to make informed decisions about their online presence. In building a public image of one’s scholarship, we will explore a range of profile systems such as Google Scholar, social media for academics, university profiles, and ORCID. While offering general tips and tricks, special attention will be given to ORCID as a versatile tool, favouring the researcher’s control. Finally, there will be plenty of space for a critical discussion on the benefits and challenges of public and open scholarship. Come prepared to explore and participate.     
  • 04 April
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
Are you comfortable using Zotero but feel like you might not be getting the most out of it? This workshop is designed for people that would like to discover some tricks for working with Zotero. We will take a hands-on approach, so please bring your computer already configured for using Zotero.
  • 19 March
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop will take you through the basics of a systematic and scoping reviews: what they are, how they differ from other types of reviews.  The session will explore the time and resources required to carry out systematic and scoping reviews, as well as outline the first steps you can take to get one started.
  • 18 January
  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Online
Oral presentation skills are essential for every graduate student to successfully convey key aspects of their work in class, at academic conferences, and to potential employers.

This workshop outlines key elements that contribute to effective presentations, including preparation, structure, and delivery. We will discuss how to construct a presentation, as well as select appropriate visual aids, and discuss strategies for delivering a presentation in an engaging manner. The information covered in this workshop applies to both in-person and virtual environments including tips for a professional presentation in a home office setting and effective virtual engagement tools.

The one-time workshop is composed of two main parts: theory and practice. Theory on the essentials of graduate presentation skills will first be presented as students construct a brief presentation in parallel. The theory portion of the workshop will then be followed by an optional opportunity for participants to deliver their constructed, 3-minute presentation among peers, as well as give and receive feedback to each other and from the workshop leader.
  • 05 April
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Online
Learn how to get, collaborate on, and share research or creative works with Creative Commons (CC) licences. Researchers frequently use these licences to enable open scholarship or open science processes. Whether you need images for a presentation, are seeking information for your own work, or want to mix sounds into new music, Creative Commons licences enable you to access and share with people around the world. In this workshop you will find out what the Creative Commons is and how to use CC licences. We will practice working with CC content and look at the ramifications of applying different licences to our own work. We will also explore some useful tools for finding CC-licensed work.
 
  • 24 October
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop focuses on the numerous art-related search tools and resources in the library and how to use them in conjunction with Google Scholar and other web tools. You will discover strategies for tracking down hard-to-find materials as well as learn about library services that give you access to an expansive network of resources in Concordia Library and beyond.
  • 02 October
  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Sir George Williams
What does research data management and preservation mean in the context of arts-based research-creation projects?  This workshop will discuss what Tri-Agency requirements exist and how they relate to the management of arts-based research materials, as well as provide guidance on the long-term preservation of digital files, including recommended file formats, storage practices, and tools for preserving specific types of content such as video or web-based art.  This workshop will also cover the resources and services that Concordia Library has on offer to assist students and faculty with management of their research materials and the archiving of their creations.
  • 15 February
  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Online

Organisation and time management


Writing emails is an essential part of everyday communication, and depending on your role, you may receive dozens, or even hundreds, of emails every day. If you want to be understood, it is critical that you learn and practice effective emailing in school, on the job, and in almost every aspect of your life.

In the digital world, we are living in, time is an asset. Acquiring good email writing skills can help ensure your message reaches your audience and that your audience is able to take action. Acquiring good email management skills will also help demonstrate your professionalism and make better use of your time.

This workshop will present best practices in email writing and organization, within the Canadian work culture. Students will have the opportunity to discuss these best practices and participate in several email writing and critiquing activities.

 
  • 23 January
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online

Effective note-taking is a key part of succeeding as a graduate student. In this workshop, we will discuss how to keep on top of your graduate studies by developing efficient note-taking and organization strategies. It is important to go into every class, reading and research project with a note-taking plan. During this workshop, participants will practice clarifying their learning objectives, be introduced to a number of different note-taking strategies, and have the opportunity to learn from one another’s methods.

This workshop will provide students with opportunites for hands on note-taking practice; participants will apply different methods for notetaking (e.g., Outlining method, Cornell method, Flow method) in the context of interesting video-based exercises.

  • 25 January
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
Building a positive relationship with your supervisor can enhance your experience in graduate school. It can smooth your way through program hurdles, like thesis writing, and contribute to building your professional and academic networks.

As a student, you need tools to navigate the potential pitfalls of a supervisory relationship and to make the most of what it can do for your academic development.
In this workshop, you will learn about the different expectations that students and supervisors can bring to the relationship, university policies around supervision, how to deal with potential conflicts, and practical tips for building and maintaining an effective relationship with your supervisor.
  • 24 January
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
This series consists of two workshops.
 
Week 1: Time Realism
 
Do you ever feel like there are not enough hours in the day? Do you feel overwhelmed by your to-do list? In this session, we'll explore how to be more realistic about time and identify strategies to make the most of our time. You'll learn about the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science and what it can tell us about how we manage time in an easier, more intuitive, and ultimately more realistic way. The key to effective time management is thinking about your time more realistically.
 
Many time management books and articles make sensational claims, such as "get 10x more done in the next week with this one simple change!" This is not only unrealistic, but it can also be discouraging when we don't see results that match the hype. So if you're ready to learn how to manage your time more effectively, sign up for this workshop today!
 
Week 2: The Science of Prioritizing
 
Social media, emails, work, school, family, friends… it's easy to feel pulled in a million different directions. In this session, we'll explore how to better manage our time and attention in the face of constant demands. You'll learn about the most powerful and effective time management strategy, one that is backed by close to 60 years of scientific research.  This strategy is so effective that it has been adopted by some of the most successful people in the world, including Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, and Elon Musk. You'll also learn about simple tools that will help you implement this strategy in your own life. We'll also cover the science of prioritizing. So, if you're ready to learn about the latest research on time management and attention, as well as some simple, yet powerful tools to help you take control of your time, then sign up for this workshop today!

 
  • 12 February - 19 February
  • 12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
  • Online
Do you wish the process of writing your thesis or next research paper was going a little faster? Do you sometimes feel unfocused, frustrated or alone in the writing process?  You probably need a boost... to be more precise, a thesis boost.

Concordia’s 3-day Thesis Boost Writing Retreat is back at Loyola Campus in May 2024.  This much-appreciated retreat is tailored for graduate students who are in the middle to later stages of preparing their thesis or writing an academic article. Bringing together advisors from the Library, Student Success Centre, Campus Wellness, and GradProSkills, this retreat provides a supportive and motivating environment where you will accelerate your writing process.

Throughout the retreat, you'll benefit from dedicated writing time and optional workshops focused on improving your writing strategies, productivity and wellness. Concordia University’s librarians and writing assistants will be available to provide personalized guidance and strategies tailored to your specific situation. Plus, you’ll connect with peers who are experiencing similar challenges.

Join us to break free from isolation, connect with fellow graduate students, and develop productive writing habits. Take a significant step towards completing your thesis!

 
IMPORTANT NOTE: Participants should have begun writing their thesis or paper before participating in this event.
 
  • 27 November - 29 November
  • 09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop offers an introduction to strategies for approaching graduate level reading requirements. It is aimed at helping graduate students manage the graduate school reading workload, apply effective reading habits, and develop consistent organizational strategies. Students of all experience levels are welcome.

This workshop will instruct participants in effective reading techniques (including skim reading and close reading methods), discuss the trade-off between time and comprehension, provide advice in selecting texts for research, and give practical tips on note-taking and organization. Students will also have the opportunity to practice using the reading techniques.

 
  • 12 March
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online
What does it mean to be a leader? This seminar introduces you to the process of leadership and the vast array of skills needed to be a leader in a variety of contexts. We will cover the fundamental skills that will shape your leadership style, including emotional intelligence, team dynamics, negotiating, solving problems, motivating others, giving feedback and intercultural communication.

The workshop series covers different modules that span over seven sessions where you must commit approximately 3.5 hours per week. Activities include working through case studies, role-plays, group discussions, and self-reflection. Upon completion of this series, you will receive a certificate and a personal plan for your leadership development.
  • 09 February - 29 March
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams
This hands-on workshop will introduce students to the modern, free, digital note-taking tool, Logseq. Integrated with Zotero and used in an academic framework, these tools can foster productive research writing. The workshop will help students start practising the principles of a Zettelkasten technique to build a personal knowledge base of literature notes, interlinked ideas, tasks, spaced repetition, visual concept maps, and more. It will show how to associate Logseq notes with bibliographic information in Zotero as part of the research writing workflow. 
  • 08 February
  • 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Sir George Williams

Preparing a thesis or research paper


Does publishing your research in a suitable journal seem impossible or mysterious? This hands-on workshop seeks to demystify journal publishing while equipping graduate students with publishing strategies that go beyond the basics of avoiding predatory journals and conferences. Participants gain practice evaluating potential journals, assessing author rights language in publishing agreements, and identifying what the journal editors are likely to look for in submitted manuscripts. As journal publishing strategies develop with practice and time, we conclude the workshop with where to go to find further help. Participants will be given choices regarding which learning objectives we will focus on. 
  • 11 April
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Researchers, particularly those in science and engineering disciplines, are expected to become good writers. An important part of their job is to present their results in a logically structured and well written research paper that includes understandable illustrations. For researchers who aim to excel in academia, it is vital to know how to communicate their research in written form because the number of citations a published paper receives is a measure of their professional success.

This workshop will cover the ways of creating and following a writing plan. It will explore the structure of a research paper, with particular attention to the design of good tables and figures. Participants will have the opportunity to examine research paper samples from peer reviewed journals.

 
  • 02 February
  • 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Concerned about the publication process and what it might look like for you and your research? Join members of the Concordia University research and publishing community with peer review experience in various disciplines, to get the inside scoop on what’s expected and what to expect.
 
  • 09 February
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Before you can write a successful paper, literature review, thesis, or any other academic work, you have to learn how to perfect the paragraph. Adopting the strategies for creating cohesive ideas, impactful statements, and a logical flow is crucial to any academic writing career.

Applicable to graduate-level writers of all backgrounds, the Perfecting the Paragraph workshop aims to provide participants with an understanding of the most common mistakes that lead to unconvincing, unclear writing. Taking the paragraph as an “idea” unit, the workshop looks at the formulation and purpose of the topic sentence. It then focuses on paragraph structure, development of the main idea, transition to the next paragraph, punctuation, style, and vocabulary.

This workshop is particularly useful for non-native English speakers. Please note that this workshop focuses on basic elements and tips important for academic paragraph writing.

This workshop is divided in three segments. The first segment will present the basic elements of an academic paragraph. The second segment will overview useful tips and resources to keep in mind while writing. In the third segment, participants will review a writing sample as part of a peer-reviewing exercise. In a supportive environment, the instructor and participants will provide feedback on randomly assigned, anonymous writing samples based on the information presented in the previous two segments. Since writing samples are anonymous, participants are highly encouraged to submit their own writing samples to be peer-reviewed during this segment.

 
  • 17 January
  • 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Your graduate thesis is one of the ways that Concordia fulfills its mission to create and disseminate knowledge. As an official Concordia document, your thesis needs to meet certain requirements.

If you are a masters or doctoral student in the early or middle stages of drafting your thesis, this workshop is for you. This workshop will review the who’s who of thesis submission, the different kinds of theses (research creation, manuscript-based, traditional), and the differing requirements needed to submit. The workshop will also cover the important deadlines and procedures for thesis submission and graduation. Participants will be able to begin planning their own thesis timeline and submission plan during the workshop.

 
  • 23 February
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online
Some publishers now require that data supporting published research be made publicly available at the time of publication. On top of increasing the impact of your research, sharing data promotes transparency, reproducibility and progress. This workshop will provide essential tips on preparing your data for publication and choosing the best place to share the data.
 
  • 31 January
  • 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop will focus on resolving the most common problems encountered with articulating a clear and effective thesis statement. It will guide students through editing strategies for turning static theses into arguments that respond dynamically to the evidence and engage the reader. This workshop will also distinguish thesis statements from other elements of the introduction paragraph.

This workshop will instruct students in the “evolving thesis” model of paper writing and research. Additionally, participants will have the chance to write their own thesis statements and introductions, and will spend a portion of the workshop working on their own material and providing feedback to one another.

Participants are encouraged to have ready a draft of an introduction of their own writing during the workshop.
 
  • 21 March
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop will define the various elements that comprise a literature review and provide practical strategies for students in the process of completing a literature review for coursework. Specific topics that are covered include identifying scholarly literature, creating and following a research plan, and assessing the usefulness of texts for your literature reviews.

Students will also have the opportunity to read and examine samples of literature reviews from completed dissertations and critique them with their peers.

 
  • 07 February
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online
Abstracts are a crucial part of the majority of academic writing. Being able to compose a concise, accurate, and attractive abstract is an essential skill for graduate students. Abstracts allow you to promote your work to a broader audience by making it easier for others to understand your work, and by increasing your chances of successful conference and journal submissions.

This workshop presents information to help you understand the contents and purpose of abstracts and essential writing strategies for crafting a summary of your work in the abstract format. The workshop includes activities that allow students to acquire writing strategies in an interactive environment, benefitting from peer feedback on their work.

 
  • 02 February
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online
The thesis proposal is an important step in the research process and can help both masters and doctoral students clarify their goals, questions, methods, and timeline. The thesis proposal is a road map to your research, and understanding how to effectively write and structure a thesis proposal can be a critical part of the research process.

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to some of the different kinds of thesis proposals and encouraged to consider how their research fits into these guides. The workshop will provide opportunities to think through research questions, theoretical frameworks, methodologies, and all the important sections that make up a thesis. It will also offer suggestions for how to structure and plan your own thesis proposal.

 
  • 14 February
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online
Finished writing your thesis, but stuck with the formatting requirements? Confused about the page numbering, what sections to include or not? Who to get in touch with about what? This workshop, then, might be able to provide answers for you. In this workshop, we will cover the different steps that you need to take to complete your program, but will also walk you through the specific formatting requirements.
  • 21 March
  • 12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
  • Online

Programming languages


Are you curious about coding, have a project in mind and don’t know where to start or think developing fundamental knowledge about programming can be helpful? In this workshop, we will use Python, a very popular, powerful, yet simple programming language to discuss and demonstrate foundational coding concepts.

 

You do not need any prior knowledge of coding or Python to participate in this workshop. If you are already familiar with coding or Python, then this workshop will be too basic for you and you should not attend.

 

You will receive an email prior to the workshop with instructions for installing Python and PyCharm on your personal computer. You will also have access to a Moodle course page.

 

This workshop consists of 3 sessions. Each session is based on a mix of theory (slides) and short practical exercises guided by the workshop leader. Between sessions, students are advised to review the material previously covered, re-do the last session’s exercises and try new exerciseson their own.

  • 23 May - 06 June
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online