Grad academic success workshops

We invite you to browse our upcoming and past workshop's by skill domains.



Ethics, rights and responsibilities


Improve your understanding of the basic rules for documentation including an introduction to multiple styles. Also, learn when and how to quote or paraphrase. Understand the Academic Code of Conduct and your responsibilities as a graduate a student.
 
  • 28 March
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Are you worried about unintentionally committing an Academic Offence? Do you want to avoid being expelled and ensure you are submitting work that fairly demonstrates your own competence? Learn everything you will need to know about the Academic Code of Conduct, various offenses, and sanctions while completing specialized activities at this workshop.
 
  • 23 March
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online

Funding and awards


Are you planning on applying for future scholarships or awards? Is a deadline fast approaching? You don’t even know how to start writing your research proposal? This workshop is for you!

Aside from the purely financial benefit of receiving a scholarship, awards also serve to recognize your achievements and focus more on your studies and your research. In this workshop, you will learn how to write a successful application, showcase your strengths, and make your proposal stand out among your peers.x
  • 23 February
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

Preparing a thesis or research paper


Concerned about the publication process and what it might look like for you and your research? Join members of the Concordia University research and publishing community with peer review experience in various disciplines, to get the inside scoop on what’s expected and what to expect.
 
  • 09 February
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Some publishers now require that data supporting published research be made publicly available at the time of publication. On top of increasing the impact of your research, sharing data promotes transparency, reproducibility and progress. This workshop will provide essential tips on preparing your data for publication and choosing the best place to share the data.
 
  • 01 February
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

Conducting research


This workshop aims to ensure that participants do not miss out on the little-known research tools and tricks which can be indispensable for effective graduate level research at Concordia in all subject areas. We will cover essentials such as:
1. Pinpointing the best spots on the library web site for graduate students
2. Discovering services, resources and perks reserved for grad students only
3. Knowing when and how to seek in-depth assistance from Concordia subject specialists
4. Using specialized and subject-specific resources
5. Optimizing access to Concordia resources from on and off campus
6. Efficiently accessing material within and beyond Concordia
Participant questions and input will be invited throughout the session.
 
  • 31 May
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop aims to ensure that participants do not miss out on the little-known research tools and tricks which can be indispensable for effective graduate level research at Concordia in all subject areas. We will cover essentials such as:
1. Pinpointing the best spots on the library web site for graduate students
2. Discovering services, resources and perks reserved for grad students only
3. Knowing when and how to seek in-depth assistance from Concordia subject specialists
4. Using specialized and subject-specific resources
5. Optimizing access to Concordia resources from on and off campus
6. Efficiently accessing material within and beyond Concordia
Participant questions and input will be invited throughout the session.
 
  • 20 September
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop aims to ensure that participants do not miss out on the little-known research tools and tricks which can be indispensable for effective graduate level research at Concordia in all subject areas. We will cover essentials such as:
1. Pinpointing the best spots on the library web site for graduate students
2. Discovering services, resources and perks reserved for grad students only
3. Knowing when and how to seek in-depth assistance from Concordia subject specialists
4. Using specialized and subject-specific resources
5. Optimizing access to Concordia resources from on and off campus
6. Efficiently accessing material within and beyond Concordia
Participant questions and input will be invited throughout the session.
 
  • 06 October
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Getting published is one of your goals as a scholar but understanding the process of getting published in not intuitive. How do you pick a journal? How do you collaborate with co-authors? When are you ready to submit? After submission, how do you respond to feedback?

This workshop provides insight into the world of professional, peer-reviewed publications. We start by exploring the considerations you should take when choosing a journal and submitting your paper. We then discuss the peer-review process and responding to feedback in a professional manner. You will have the opportunity to critique real-life examples of journals, reviewer feedback and author responses.

 
  • 20 May
  • 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Getting published is one of your goals as a scholar but understanding the process of getting published in not intuitive. How do you pick a journal? How do you collaborate with co-authors? When are you ready to submit? After submission, how do you respond to feedback?

This workshop provides insight into the world of professional, peer-reviewed publications. We start by exploring the considerations you should take when choosing a journal and submitting your paper. We then discuss the peer-review process and responding to feedback in a professional manner. You will have the opportunity to critique real-life examples of journals, reviewer feedback and author responses.

 
  • 07 October
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
This workshop will guide participants through the first steps of doing data analysis, specifically text mining with Weka.
 
Weka is an open-source machine-learning tool. We will be replicating the work of Mike Thelwall in his paper on Gender bias in machine learning for sentiment analysis.

Before getting into the hands-on text mining exercise, we will present a brief introduction to AI and machine learning, as well as the notion of algorithmic bias; what it is, how is introduced, and its repercussions.

By the end of the workshop participants will have applied a sentiment analysis technique to a gender-segregated data set and be able to determine its effect on the resulting predictive model.
 
  • 11 May
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop will guide participants through the first steps of doing data analysis, specifically text mining with Weka.
 
Weka is an open-source machine-learning tool. We will be replicating the work of Mike Thelwall in his paper on Gender bias in machine learning for sentiment analysis.

Before getting into the hands-on text mining exercise, we will present a brief introduction to AI and machine learning, as well as the notion of algorithmic bias; what it is, how is introduced, and its repercussions.

By the end of the workshop participants will have applied a sentiment analysis technique to a gender-segregated data set and be able to determine its effect on the resulting predictive model.
 
  • 09 November
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
What do you do during a poster session?  What makes for a successful academic poster?  Maybe you have been doing research for a long time and don’t know how to condense it.  Maybe you are new to the research world, and you doubt that you have enough done to present.  In this workshop, we discuss the academic poster session, how to design a poster, and provide some tips for shining as you present your poster.
 
Part of this workshop may be in french.
  • 25 November
  • 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Do you have data you'd like to analyze? Would you like to gain insights from your data and communicate them with eye-catching visualizations and reports? Are you tired of being chained to Excel or expensive proprietary software? If the answer to any of these questions is "Yes!", then this workshop is for you. R is an open-source and versatile programming language that's perfect for data analysis, visualization, and science communication.

In this all-in-one course, you'll learn the basics of programming and be introduced to the RStudio interface. We'll then move on to how to import and clean data, how to make publication-quality plots and visualizations, and how to generate scientific reports to communicate your findings; all within the R ecosystem!

In this three-part interactive workshop, you'll learn to:
• Import CSV and Excel files
• Install and use external packages
• Clean and explore data
• Generate descriptive statistics
• Create and customize plots
• Write custom functions

All of this is done with principles of reproducibility in mind, so you can write code that is clear and easily shareable with others. No previous coding experience is necessary. R is used in fields ranging from linguistics and marketing to ecology and sports analytics and many more. If you want the ability to get more out of your data, join us to get started using R.
  • 21 September - 05 October
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Do you have data you'd like to analyze? Would you like to gain insights from your data and communicate them with eye-catching visualizations and reports? Are you tired of being chained to Excel or expensive proprietary software? If the answer to any of these questions is "Yes!", then this workshop is for you. R is an open-source and versatile programming language that's perfect for data analysis, visualization, and science communication.

In this all-in-one course, you'll learn the basics of programming and be introduced to the RStudio interface. We'll then move on to how to import and clean data, how to make publication-quality plots and visualizations, and how to generate scientific reports to communicate your findings; all within the R ecosystem!

In this three-part interactive workshop, you'll learn to:
• Import CSV and Excel files
• Install and use external packages
• Clean and explore data
• Generate descriptive statistics
• Create and customize plots
• Write custom functions

All of this is done with principles of reproducibility in mind, so you can write code that is clear and easily shareable with others. No previous coding experience is necessary. R is used in fields ranging from linguistics and marketing to ecology and sports analytics and many more. If you want the ability to get more out of your data, join us to get started using R.
  • 28 October - 11 November
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Do you have data you'd like to analyze? Would you like to gain insights from your data and communicate them with eye-catching visualizations and reports? Are you tired of being chained to Excel or expensive proprietary software? If the answer to any of these questions is "Yes!", then this workshop is for you. R is an open-source and versatile programming language that's perfect for data analysis, visualization, and science communication.

In this all-in-one course, you'll learn the basics of programming and be introduced to the RStudio interface. We'll then move on to how to import and clean data, how to make publication-quality plots and visualizations, and how to generate scientific reports to communicate your findings; all within the R ecosystem!

In this three-part interactive workshop, you'll learn to:
• Import CSV and Excel files
• Install and use external packages
• Clean and explore data
• Generate descriptive statistics
• Create and customize plots
• Write custom functions

All of this is done with principles of reproducibility in mind, so you can write code that is clear and easily shareable with others. No previous coding experience is necessary. R is used in fields ranging from linguistics and marketing to ecology and sports analytics and many more. If you want the ability to get more out of your data, join us to get started using R.
  • 06 May - 20 May
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Online
OpenRefine is a powerful, free tool that simplifies working with messy data. During this workshop, attendees will learn how OpenRefine can be used to clean and normalize data sets, reorder columns, filter data, and transform data sets into different file types.
 
  • 12 October
  • 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to use Zotero, a desktop and web-based tool that you can use to organize the references you find in library catalogues and databases, insert citations in your papers, and prepare bibliographies or reference lists quickly and effectively, in a wide variety of citation styles (e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago, et cetera). We will look at integrating Zotero with Microsoft Word, LibreOffice, and Google Docs. We will also cover how to share folders and citations (e.g., for collaborative projects or to disseminate reading lists). No experience with Zotero is necessary.

Please ensure that you set up Zotero in advance of the workshop. You can find instructions on how to set up Zotero on the Library website: https://library.concordia.ca/help/workshops/zotero-prerequisites.pdf

 
  • 09 May
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to use Zotero, a desktop and web-based tool that you can use to organize the references you find in library catalogues and databases, insert citations in your papers, and prepare bibliographies or reference lists quickly and effectively, in a wide variety of citation styles (e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago, et cetera). We will look at integrating Zotero with Microsoft Word, LibreOffice, and Google Docs. We will also cover how to share folders and citations (e.g., for collaborative projects or to disseminate reading lists). No experience with Zotero is necessary.

Please ensure that you set up Zotero in advance of the workshop. You can find instructions on how to set up Zotero on the Library website: https://library.concordia.ca/help/workshops/zotero-prerequisites.pdf

 
  • 27 September
  • 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Loyola
In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to use Zotero, a desktop and web-based tool that you can use to organize the references you find in library catalogues and databases, insert citations in your papers, and prepare bibliographies or reference lists quickly and effectively, in a wide variety of citation styles (e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago, et cetera). We will look at integrating Zotero with Microsoft Word, LibreOffice, and Google Docs. We will also cover how to share folders and citations (e.g., for collaborative projects or to disseminate reading lists). No experience with Zotero is necessary.

Please ensure that you set up Zotero in advance of the workshop. You can find instructions on how to set up Zotero on the Library website: https://library.concordia.ca/help/workshops/zotero-prerequisites.pdf

 
  • 05 October
  • 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop will introduce participants to the practice of web archiving and show them how to preserve their web content using free and open-source tools. This workshop should be of particluar interest for graduate students looking to preserve their thesis project websites, researchers who are concerned about the future of their grant-funded project websites, and anyone with web-published content that they would like to keep useable and accessible long-term.
 
This is an introductory-level workshop and no prior knowledge or technical skills are needed.
 
Important note: participants are encouraged to create a free account with Conifer ahead of the workshop: https://conifer.rhizome.org/.
  • 20 October
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
This workshop will focus on the main sources of social statistics in Canada, namely Statistics Canada's Website, more specifically the Data section and the Canadian Census. Provincial statistics (Institut de la Statistique du Québec) will also be mentioned. The second part of the presentation will present the concept of microdata and introduce students to data available through the Data Liberation Initiative (DLI). We will review the best methods to identify relevant surveys. The various types of data files (PUMFs, Master Files) will be described and students will be shown how to access those files via the Odesi database or by going to the Research Data Centre at McGill (QICSS). There will be a demonstration of Odesi which will focus on searching the platform for surveys and individual variables and on downloading datasets and associated documentation.
  • 12 October
  • 09:00 AM - 10:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams

Critical and creative thinking


This workshop will get you started in the world of synthesizers. A short introduction to the basics of sound will be followed by a look at how the components of a synthesizer work together to make sound synthesis possible.

 

No music theory or knowledge is required. Feel free to prepare questions and sounds you would like to synthesize.

 

  • 26 September
  • 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams

Ethics, rights and responsibilities


Improve your understanding of the basic rules for documentation including an introduction to multiple styles. Also, learn when and how to quote or paraphrase. Understand the Academic Code of Conduct and your responsibilities as a graduate a student.
 
  • 12 May
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Improve your understanding of the basic rules for documentation including an introduction to multiple styles. Also, learn when and how to quote or paraphrase. Understand the Academic Code of Conduct and your responsibilities as a graduate a student.
 
  • 11 October
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Improve your understanding of the basic rules for documentation including an introduction to multiple styles. Also, learn when and how to quote or paraphrase. Understand the Academic Code of Conduct and your responsibilities as a graduate a student.
 
  • 09 November
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
Are you worried about unintentionally committing an Academic Offence? Do you want to avoid being expelled and ensure you are submitting work that fairly demonstrates your own competence? Learn everything you will need to know about the Academic Code of Conduct, various offenses, and sanctions while completing specialized activities at this workshop.
 
  • 10 May
  • 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM
  • Online
Are you worried about unintentionally committing an Academic Offence? Do you want to avoid being expelled and ensure you are submitting work that fairly demonstrates your own competence? Learn everything you will need to know about the Academic Code of Conduct, various offenses, and sanctions while completing specialized activities at this workshop.
 
  • 07 July
  • 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM
  • Online
Are you worried about unintentionally committing an Academic Offence? Do you want to avoid being expelled and ensure you are submitting work that fairly demonstrates your own competence? Learn everything you will need to know about the Academic Code of Conduct, various offenses, and sanctions while completing specialized activities at this workshop.
 
  • 04 August
  • 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM
  • Online
Are you worried about unintentionally committing an Academic Offence? Do you want to avoid being expelled and ensure you are submitting work that fairly demonstrates your own competence? Learn everything you will need to know about the Academic Code of Conduct, various offenses, and sanctions while completing specialized activities at this workshop.
 
  • 22 September
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
Are you worried about unintentionally committing an Academic Offence? Do you want to avoid being expelled and ensure you are submitting work that fairly demonstrates your own competence? Learn everything you will need to know about the Academic Code of Conduct, various offenses, and sanctions while completing specialized activities at this workshop.
 
  • 30 November
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
Learn the basics about patents and how to search for them. Patents is a form of intellectual property for protecting inventions. This workshop is aimed at providing a general overview of intellectual property and patents. What purpose do they serve? What does a patent look like? Where to search for patents? How does one file for a patent in Canada?
 
This workshop may be of particular interest to engineering and computer science students, but all are welcome.  
  • 16 November
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Sir George Williams

Funding and awards


This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

There are many elements that need to be compiled before a complete scholarship application can be submitted. While many statements are written by the applicant, time is also required for 1) peer-review of those statements, 2) ordering official transcripts, 3) letters of support, and so on. The aim of this workshop is to present possible timelines that will help to anticipate the needs of most tri-agency and FRQ applications - due in the coming weeks and months.

Note: Students are ultimately still responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out on by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select.

 
  • 09 August
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
Are you seeking to expand your professional network, develop a research partnership or land an internship? Join us to learn more about Mitacs graduate research funding programs and how they can help you carve out your career path.

This workshop will present an overview of the industrial research landscape in Montreal, Quebec and Canada. Participants will learn how to identify a potential employer or research partner, and develop strategies to approach a company for an internship or partnership.

Mitacs builds partnerships between academia, industry and the world to create a more innovative Canada. Through unique research funding and training programs, Mitacs aims to support the development of the next generation of innovators with vital scientific and business skills.

This workshop provides an overview of the Mitacs Accelerate, Elevate, Globalink, Step and Converge programs. It also outlines basic techniques for identifying and reaching out to industry partners.

 
  • 02 June
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Are you seeking to expand your professional network, develop a research partnership or land an internship? Join us to learn more about Mitacs graduate research funding programs and how they can help you carve out your career path.

This workshop will present an overview of the industrial research landscape in Montreal, Quebec and Canada. Participants will learn how to identify a potential employer or research partner, and develop strategies to approach a company for an internship or partnership.

Mitacs builds partnerships between academia, industry and the world to create a more innovative Canada. Through unique research funding and training programs, Mitacs aims to support the development of the next generation of innovators with vital scientific and business skills.

This workshop provides an overview of the Mitacs Accelerate, Elevate, Globalink, Step and Converge programs. It also outlines basic techniques for identifying and reaching out to industry partners.

 
  • 19 October
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Writing strategies and tips can often be applied globally, so this workshop aims to offer ways that graduate students can develop and improve their scholarship applications. For example, this workshop will offer writing tips to aid in the development of many standard and essential sections of the application (e.g. outline of proposed research, and other applicant statements). Funding agencies typically expect students to be the author of their own applications, but this does not mean writing in isolation – and does not exclude the important contributions and feedback of peers, research supervisors and other mentors.
  • 16 June
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
The scholarship is only open to Canadian citizens and permanent residents
 
This information session will explain the application process for the CGS M scholarship program and will provide an overview of program eligibility and application requirements. This session is intended for first year master’s students / final year undergrad students in or planning to apply to research/thesis-based programs.
 
If you are an undergraduate student interested in joining this workshop, please email gradproskills@concordia.ca to register.
  • 27 October
  • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Online
There are numerous funding programs available to graduate students who are undertaking academic research and working towards a thesis. This workshop will introduce the scholarship programs and funding agencies available to Concordia graduate students.

There will be an overview of the major federal and provincial funding agencies that provide research scholarships in the social sciences and humanities (SSHRC, FRQSC), Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSERC, FRQNT), and health (CIHR, FRQS). Students will be oriented to the 1) research areas and programs that each of these agencies support, 2) eligibility criteria, 3) funding cycles, and 4) basic elements of an application. In addition, the session will explain specific funding programs that require institutional pre-selection/nomination such as the PBEEE (under the FRQ), and the prestigious Vanier scholarship program (tri-agency).

The workshop leaders will also speak to the conference, research travel funds and mobility awards that are accessible through Concordia International and the School of Graduate Studies. Complementary information sessions about studying abroad on exchange are offered regularly by Concordia International.

Note: Students are ultimately responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select.

 
  • 10 May
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
There are numerous funding programs available to graduate students who are undertaking academic research and working towards a thesis. This workshop will introduce the scholarship programs and funding agencies available to Concordia graduate students.

There will be an overview of the major federal and provincial funding agencies that provide research scholarships in the social sciences and humanities (SSHRC, FRQSC), Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSERC, FRQNT), and health (CIHR, FRQS). Students will be oriented to the 1) research areas and programs that each of these agencies support, 2) eligibility criteria, 3) funding cycles, and 4) basic elements of an application. In addition, the session will explain specific funding programs that require institutional pre-selection/nomination such as the PBEEE (under the FRQ), and the prestigious Vanier scholarship program (tri-agency).

The workshop leaders will also speak to the conference, research travel funds and mobility awards that are accessible through Concordia International and the School of Graduate Studies. Complementary information sessions about studying abroad on exchange are offered regularly by Concordia International.

Note: Students are ultimately responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select.

 
  • 06 September
  • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Online
There are numerous funding programs available to graduate students who are undertaking academic research and working towards a thesis. This workshop will introduce the scholarship programs and funding agencies available to Concordia graduate students.

There will be an overview of the major federal and provincial funding agencies that provide research scholarships in the social sciences and humanities (SSHRC, FRQSC), Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSERC, FRQNT), and health (CIHR, FRQS). Students will be oriented to the 1) research areas and programs that each of these agencies support, 2) eligibility criteria, 3) funding cycles, and 4) basic elements of an application. In addition, the session will explain specific funding programs that require institutional pre-selection/nomination such as the PBEEE (under the FRQ), and the prestigious Vanier scholarship program (tri-agency).

The workshop leaders will also speak to the conference, research travel funds and mobility awards that are accessible through Concordia International and the School of Graduate Studies. Complementary information sessions about studying abroad on exchange are offered regularly by Concordia International.

Note: Students are ultimately responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select.

 
  • 20 September
  • 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Research proposals vary tremendously between departments, research areas, and individuals, but there are also standard ways to present this material for each agency and scholarship program. Most fundamentally, this requires that all applicants read the program instructions carefully for the drafts they are creating. For example, several programs require clear 1) background/introduction, 2) hypothesis/aims/objectives, 3) method/description, 4) Implications/Impact. This can often mean creating sub-headings within your proposal to explicitly identify and address each of these elements.
  • 05 July
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

Research proposals vary tremendously between departments, research areas, and individuals, but there are also standard ways to present this material for each agency and scholarship program. Most fundamentally, this requires that all applicants read the program instructions carefully for the drafts they are creating. For example, several programs require clear 1) background/introduction, 2) hypothesis/aims/objectives, 3) method/description, 4) Implications/Impact. This can often mean creating sub-headings within your proposal to explicitly identify and address each of these elements.

 
  • 07 July
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
This workshop is intended for current or future students in research-based graduate programs, who are preparing a Fall scholarship application to a federal or provincial government research agency.

There are many elements that need to be compiled before a complete scholarship application can be submitted. While many statements are written by the applicant, time is also required for 1) peer-review of those statements, 2) ordering official transcripts, 3) letters of support, and so on. The aim of this workshop is to present possible timelines that will help to anticipate the needs of most tri-agency and FRQ applications - due in the coming weeks and months.
  • 11 August
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online

This is a live Q&A session moderated by a representative from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). Students will have the opportunity to ask specific questions about the NSERC doctoral (CGS D/PGS D) and postdoctoral (PDF) programs, whose application deadline dates are imminent.

 

NSERC’s Q&A sessions are supported by a series of informational videos available on the NSERC YouTube channel. After registering, participants will be sent a link to the videos they must watch in advance and come to the Q&A session with specific questions in mind.

  • 13 September
  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Online
This workshop will help students to improve their draft research proposals for scholarship applications, many of which are due in the coming weeks. In this class, we will focus on applications to the major federal and provincial agencies providing scholarships in research sectors related to natural sciences and engineering (NSERC, FRQNT), as well as health (CIHR, FRQS). A brief overview of general strategies and tips regarding the research proposals, will be followed by breakout groups where students will discuss and brainstorm their emerging proposals.
In addition to having an outline of their own proposed research prepared before class, students will also be entrusted with the chance to discuss the work of others. Some of this will be done within the workshop setting, while some amount of “homework” will need to be exchanged by email in the days following this meeting. This exchange of feedback (peer-review) between students is expected to unfold in a respectful, confidential, and constructive way.
***Notes: Students are ultimately responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out on by each agency for the specific funding program( s) they select. Peer-review can be an excellent source of constructive criticism, but it is the responsibility of the individual author to decide which feedback to use.***
 
  • 08 September
  • 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Online
This workshop will help students to improve their draft research proposals for scholarship applications, many of which are due in the coming weeks. In this class, we will focus on applications to the major federal and provincial agencies providing scholarships in research sectors related to the social sciences, humanities, and arts (SSHRC & FRQSC). A brief overview of general strategies and tips regarding the research proposals, will be followed by breakout groups where students will discuss and brainstorm their emerging proposals.
In addition to having an outline of their own proposed research prepared before class, students will also be entrusted with the chance to discuss the work of others. Some of this will be done within the workshop setting, while some amount of “homework” will likely be exchanged by email in the days following this meeting. This exchange of feedback (peer-review) between students is expected to unfold in a respectful, confidential, and constructive way.
***Notes: Students are ultimately responsible for ensuring their own applications conform to the instructions and standards laid out on by each agency for the specific funding program(s) they select. Peer-review can be an excellent source of constructive criticism, but it is the responsibility of the individual author to decide which feedback to use.***
  • 09 September
  • 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online

Knowledge and research dissemination


Oral presentation skills are essential for every graduate student to successfully convey key aspects of their work in class, at academic conferences, and to potential employers.

This workshop series will outline elements that contribute to effective presentations, including preparation, structure, and delivery. We will discuss how to construct a presentation, as well as select appropriate visual aids and strategies to deliver your presentation in an engaging manner.

In addition, we have updated this workshop to include strategies for presenting in virtual environments including tips for a professional presentation in a home office setting and effective virtual engagement tools.

The first part will present the theory on the essentials of graduate presentation skills. Optional 2nd part: participants will be asked to prepare and deliver a 3-minutes presentation to the class and will receive feedback from both their peers and the workshop leader.
  • 24 May
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Oral presentation skills are essential for every graduate student to successfully convey key aspects of their work in class, at academic conferences, and to potential employers.

This workshop series will outline elements that contribute to effective presentations, including preparation, structure, and delivery. We will discuss how to construct a presentation, as well as select appropriate visual aids and strategies to deliver your presentation in an engaging manner.

In addition, we have updated this workshop to include strategies for presenting in virtual environments including tips for a professional presentation in a home office setting and effective virtual engagement tools.

The first part will present the theory on the essentials of graduate presentation skills. Optional 2nd part: participants will be asked to prepare and deliver a 3-minutes presentation to the class and will receive feedback from both their peers and the workshop leader.
  • 03 November
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams
Oral presentation skills are essential for every graduate student to successfully convey key aspects of their work in class, at academic conferences, and to potential employers.

This workshop series will outline elements that contribute to effective presentations, including preparation, structure, and delivery. We will discuss how to construct a presentation, as well as select appropriate visual aids and strategies to deliver your presentation in an engaging manner.

In addition, we have updated this workshop to include strategies for presenting in virtual environments including tips for a professional presentation in a home office setting and effective virtual engagement tools.

The first part will present the theory on the essentials of graduate presentation skills. Optional 2nd part: participants will be asked to prepare and deliver a 3-minutes presentation to the class and will receive feedback from both their peers and the workshop leader.
  • 20 September
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
The peer-reviewed monograph is one of the primary ways by which in scholars in many disciplines share and disseminate their research. In this workshop, Concordia University Press's acquisitions editor will give a brief overview of scholarly book publishing in the humanities and qualitative social sciences. This session will discuss the key stages in the book publication process to help first-time authors know what to expect, as well as how to present their research as a proposal, how to prepare a manuscript for peer review, for funding applications, and for copyediting and proofreading.
 
  • 01 November
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop focuses on the numerous art-related search tools and resources in the library and how to use them in conjunction with Google Scholar and other web tools. You will discover strategies for tracking down hard-to-find materials as well as learn about library services that give you access to an expansive network of resources in Concordia Library and beyond.
  • 26 September
  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
  • Sir George Williams

Organisation and time management


Writing emails is an essential part of everyday communication, and depending on your role, you may receive dozens, or even hundreds, of emails every day. If you want to be understood, it is critical that you learn and practice effective emailing in school, on the job, and in almost every aspect of your life.

In the digital world, we are living in, time is an asset. Acquiring good email writing skills can help ensure your message reaches your audience and that your audience is able to take action. Acquiring good email management skills will also help demonstrate your professionalism and make better use of your time.

This workshop will present best practices in email writing and organization, within the Canadian work culture. Students will have the opportunity to discuss these best practices and participate in several email writing and critiquing activities.

 
  • 14 June
  • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Online
Writing emails is an essential part of everyday communication, and depending on your role, you may receive dozens, or even hundreds, of emails every day. If you want to be understood, it is critical that you learn and practice effective emailing in school, on the job, and in almost every aspect of your life.

In the digital world, we are living in, time is an asset. Acquiring good email writing skills can help ensure your message reaches your audience and that your audience is able to take action. Acquiring good email management skills will also help demonstrate your professionalism and make better use of your time.

This workshop will present best practices in email writing and organization, within the Canadian work culture. Students will have the opportunity to discuss these best practices and participate in several email writing and critiquing activities.

 
  • 29 September
  • 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
  • Online
Effective note-taking is a key part of succeeding as a graduate student. In this workshop, we will discuss how to keep on top of your graduate studies by developing efficient note-taking and organization strategies.

It is important to go into every reading and research project with a note-taking plan. During this workshop, participants will practice clarifying their reading objectives, be introduced to a number of different note-taking tools, and have the opportunity to learn from one another’s methods.

 
  • 15 June
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
Effective note-taking is a key part of succeeding as a graduate student. In this workshop, we will discuss how to keep on top of your graduate studies by developing efficient note-taking and organization strategies.

It is important to go into every reading and research project with a note-taking plan. During this workshop, participants will practice clarifying their reading objectives, be introduced to a number of different note-taking tools, and have the opportunity to learn from one another’s methods.

 
  • 04 October
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online
Does your thesis or research paper need a boost? Then join us for this hybrid three-day writing event, hosted in a supportive and motivating setting, and take a leap towards finishing your writing project.
 
Thesis Boost is for graduate students in the middle to later stages of writing their thesis or research papers. In partnership with the Library, Student Success Centre and Campus Wellness, we will offer you dedicated writing time, optional workshops, activities, and consultations with librarians and writing advisors to advance your writing project and adopt productive writing habits.
 
Library computers can be used as availability permits.
 
IMPORTANT NOTE: Participants should have begun writing their thesis or paper before participating in this event.
 
 
  • 23 November - 25 November
  • 09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Does your thesis or research paper need a boost? Then join us for this hybrid three-day writing event, hosted in a supportive and motivating setting, and take a leap towards finishing your writing project.
 
Thesis Boost is for graduate students in the middle to later stages of writing their thesis or research papers. In partnership with the Library, Student Success Centre and Campus Wellness, we will offer you dedicated writing time, optional workshops, activities, and consultations with librarians and writing advisors to advance your writing project and adopt productive writing habits.
 
Library computers can be used as availability permits.
 
IMPORTANT NOTE: Participants should have begun writing their thesis or paper before participating in this event.
 
 
  • 18 May - 20 May
  • 09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
  • In person & online
This workshop offers an introduction to strategies for approaching graduate level reading requirements. It is aimed at helping graduate students manage the graduate school reading workload, apply effective reading habits, and develop consistent organizational strategies. Students of all experience levels are welcome.

This workshop will instruct participants in effective reading techniques (including skim reading and close reading methods), discuss the trade-off between time and comprehension, provide advice in selecting texts for research, and give practical tips on note-taking and organization. Students will also have the opportunity to practice using the reading techniques.
 
  • 16 September
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop offers an introduction to strategies for approaching graduate level reading requirements. It is aimed at helping graduate students manage the graduate school reading workload, apply effective reading habits, and develop consistent organizational strategies. Students of all experience levels are welcome.

This workshop will instruct participants in effective reading techniques (including skim reading and close reading methods), discuss the trade-off between time and comprehension, provide advice in selecting texts for research, and give practical tips on note-taking and organization. Students will also have the opportunity to practice using the reading techniques.
 
  • 28 October
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
What does it mean to be a leader? This seminar introduces you to the process of leadership and the vast array of skills needed to be a leader in a variety of contexts. We will cover the fundamental skills that will shape your leadership style, including emotional intelligence, team dynamics, negotiating, solving problems, motivating others, giving feedback and intercultural communication. You will also evaluate your leadership potential by taking the CliftonStrengths assessment, which helps you reflect on how your talents can build your leadership reflexes.

The workshop series covers different modules that span over seven weeks where you must commit approximately 3.5 hours per week. Activities include working through case studies, role-plays, group discussions, and self-reflection. Upon completion of this series, you will receive a certificate, have your personal CliftonStrengths Top 5 report, and a personal plan for your leadership development.
  • 05 May - 16 June
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams
What does it mean to be a leader? This seminar introduces you to the process of leadership and the vast array of skills needed to be a leader in a variety of contexts. We will cover the fundamental skills that will shape your leadership style, including emotional intelligence, team dynamics, negotiating, solving problems, motivating others, giving feedback and intercultural communication. You will also evaluate your leadership potential by taking the CliftonStrengths assessment, which helps you reflect on how your talents can build your leadership reflexes.

The workshop series covers different modules that span over seven weeks where you must commit approximately 3.5 hours per week. Activities include working through case studies, role-plays, group discussions, and self-reflection. Upon completion of this series, you will receive a certificate, have your personal CliftonStrengths Top 5 report, and a personal plan for your leadership development.
  • 25 October - 06 December
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
What does it mean to be a leader? This seminar introduces you to the process of leadership and the vast array of skills needed to be a leader in a variety of contexts. We will cover the fundamental skills that will shape your leadership style, including emotional intelligence, team dynamics, negotiating, solving problems, motivating others, giving feedback and intercultural communication. You will also evaluate your leadership potential by taking the CliftonStrengths assessment, which helps you reflect on how your talents can build your leadership reflexes.

The workshop series covers different modules that span over seven weeks where you must commit approximately 3.5 hours per week. Activities include working through case studies, role-plays, group discussions, and self-reflection. Upon completion of this series, you will receive a certificate, have your personal CliftonStrengths Top 5 report, and a personal plan for your leadership development.
  • 30 September - 11 November
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams
This high-level workshop will introduce students to some modern, free, academic tools and how they support digital note-taking for research writing. The workshop will briefly introduce students to some principles of the Zettelkasten technique with examples for taking literature notes. It will show how to associate notes and writing with bibliographic information in Zotero. Emphasis will be on the free tools Zotero, Logseq, and Zettlr with brief discussion of alternative personal knowledge management tools and resources.
 
The workshop will offer some basic techniques of using Markdown, YAML, and simple queries but does not require programming knowledge.
  • 10 November
  • 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM
  • Sir George Williams

Preparing a thesis or research paper


Interdisciplinary bibliography building has the power to shed new light on research questions, corpuses, data, and objects of study. This workshop is aimed at researchers at the graduate level interested in interdisciplinarity, in exploring parallel research across fields, and in finding tools to facilitate or improve their searches. This workshop should be of specific interest to students enrolled in Interdisciplinary Programs, namely the Humanities Ph.D., Individualized Program (Phd, MA, MSc), and to graduate students considering an interdisciplinary approach. We will go beyond the basics by exploring search strategies and tools aimed at developing a comprehensive bibliography across social science, humanities, and fine arts disciplines. Tools and skills learned will be useful for preparing for various stages of the research process, namely the proposal, annotated bibliography and/or literature review, comprehensive exams, research forums and the writing of thesis chapters.
 
  • 10 November
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
Before you can write a successful paper, literature review, thesis, or any other academic work, you have to learn how to perfect the paragraph. Adopting the strategies for creating cohesive ideas, impactful statements, and a logical flow is crucial to any academic writing career.
Applicable to graduate-level writers of all backgrounds, the Perfecting the Paragraph workshop aims to provide participants with an understanding of the most common mistakes that lead to unconvincing, unclear writing. Taking the paragraph as an “idea” unit, the workshop looks at the formulation and purpose of the topic sentence. It then focuses on paragraph structure, development of the main idea, transition to the next paragraph, punctuation, style, and vocabulary.

This workshop is particularly useful for non-native English speakers. Please note that this workshop focuses on basic elements and tips important for academic paragraph writing.

This workshop is divided in three segments. The first segment will present the basic elements of an academic paragraph. The second segment will overview useful tips and resources to keep in mind while writing. In the third segment, participants will review a writing sample as part of a peer-reviewing exercise. In a supportive environment, the instructor and participants will provide feedback on randomly assigned, anonymous writing samples based on the information presented in the previous two segments. Since writing samples are anonymous, participants are highly encouraged to submit their own writing samples to be peer-reviewed during this segment.

 
  • 19 May
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Before you can write a successful paper, literature review, thesis, or any other academic work, you have to learn how to perfect the paragraph. Adopting the strategies for creating cohesive ideas, impactful statements, and a logical flow is crucial to any academic writing career.
Applicable to graduate-level writers of all backgrounds, the Perfecting the Paragraph workshop aims to provide participants with an understanding of the most common mistakes that lead to unconvincing, unclear writing. Taking the paragraph as an “idea” unit, the workshop looks at the formulation and purpose of the topic sentence. It then focuses on paragraph structure, development of the main idea, transition to the next paragraph, punctuation, style, and vocabulary.

This workshop is particularly useful for non-native English speakers. Please note that this workshop focuses on basic elements and tips important for academic paragraph writing.

This workshop is divided in three segments. The first segment will present the basic elements of an academic paragraph. The second segment will overview useful tips and resources to keep in mind while writing. In the third segment, participants will review a writing sample as part of a peer-reviewing exercise. In a supportive environment, the instructor and participants will provide feedback on randomly assigned, anonymous writing samples based on the information presented in the previous two segments. Since writing samples are anonymous, participants are highly encouraged to submit their own writing samples to be peer-reviewed during this segment.

 
  • 16 November
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Your graduate thesis is one of the ways that Concordia fulfills its mission to create and disseminate knowledge. As an official Concordia document, your thesis needs to meet certain requirements.

If you are a masters or doctoral student in the early or middle stages of drafting your thesis, this workshop is for you. This workshop will review the who’s who of thesis submission, the different kinds of theses (research creation, manuscript-based, traditional), and the differing requirements needed to submit. The workshop will also cover the important deadlines and procedures for thesis submission and graduation. Participants will be able to begin planning their own thesis timeline and submission plan during the workshop.

 
  • 18 May
  • 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM
  • Online
Your graduate thesis is one of the ways that Concordia fulfills its mission to create and disseminate knowledge. As an official Concordia document, your thesis needs to meet certain requirements.

If you are a masters or doctoral student in the early or middle stages of drafting your thesis, this workshop is for you. This workshop will review the who’s who of thesis submission, the different kinds of theses (research creation, manuscript-based, traditional), and the differing requirements needed to submit. The workshop will also cover the important deadlines and procedures for thesis submission and graduation. Participants will be able to begin planning their own thesis timeline and submission plan during the workshop.

 
  • 14 October
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
The peer-reviewed monograph is one of the primary ways by which in scholars in many disciplines share and disseminate their research. In this workshop, Concordia University Press's acquisitions editor will give a brief overview of scholarly book publishing in the humanities and qualitative social sciences. This session will discuss the key stages in the book publication process to help first-time authors know what to expect, as well as how to present their research as a proposal, how to prepare a manuscript for peer review, for funding applications, and for copyediting and proofreading.
 
  • 01 November
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop will focus on resolving the most common problems encountered with articulating a clear and effective thesis statement. It will guide students through editing strategies for turning static theses into arguments that respond dynamically to the evidence and engage the reader. This workshop will also distinguish thesis statements from other elements of the introduction paragraph.

This workshop will instruct students in the “evolving thesis” model of paper writing and research. Additionally, participants will have the chance to write their own thesis statements and introductions, and will spend a portion of the workshop working on their own material and providing feedback to one another.

Participants are encouraged to have ready a draft of an introduction of their own writing during the workshop.
 
  • 21 September
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop will define the various elements that comprise a literature review and provide practical strategies for students in the process of completing a literature review for coursework. Specific topics that are covered include identifying scholarly literature, creating and following a research plan, and assessing the usefulness of texts for your literature reviews.

Students will also have the opportunity to read and examine samples of literature reviews from completed dissertations and critique them with their peers.

 
  • 08 June
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
This workshop will define the various elements that comprise a literature review and provide practical strategies for students in the process of completing a literature review for coursework. Specific topics that are covered include identifying scholarly literature, creating and following a research plan, and assessing the usefulness of texts for your literature reviews.

Students will also have the opportunity to read and examine samples of literature reviews from completed dissertations and critique them with their peers.

 
  • 14 September
  • 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Sir George Williams
This workshop will define the various elements that comprise a literature review and provide practical strategies for students in the process of completing a literature review for coursework. Specific topics that are covered include identifying scholarly literature, creating and following a research plan, and assessing the usefulness of texts for your literature reviews.

Students will also have the opportunity to read and examine samples of literature reviews from completed dissertations and critique them with their peers.

 
  • 02 November
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online
Abstracts are a crucial part of the majority of academic writing. Being able to compose a concise, accurate, and attractive abstract is an essential skill for graduate students. Abstracts allow you to promote your work to a broader audience by making it easier for others to understand your work, and by increasing your chances of successful conference and journal submissions.

This workshop presents information to help you understand the contents and purpose of abstracts and essential writing strategies for crafting a summary of your work in the abstract format. The workshop includes activities that allow students to acquire writing strategies in an interactive environment, benefitting from peer feedback on their work.

 
  • 31 May
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Sir George Williams
Abstracts are a crucial part of the majority of academic writing. Being able to compose a concise, accurate, and attractive abstract is an essential skill for graduate students. Abstracts allow you to promote your work to a broader audience by making it easier for others to understand your work, and by increasing your chances of successful conference and journal submissions.

This workshop presents information to help you understand the contents and purpose of abstracts and essential writing strategies for crafting a summary of your work in the abstract format. The workshop includes activities that allow students to acquire writing strategies in an interactive environment, benefitting from peer feedback on their work.

 
  • 10 November
  • 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
  • Online
The thesis proposal is an important step in the research process and can help both masters and doctoral students clarify their goals, questions, methods, and timeline. The thesis proposal is a road map to your research, and understanding how to effectively write and structure a thesis proposal can be a critical part of the research process.

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to some of the different kinds of thesis proposals and encouraged to consider how their research fits into these guides. The workshop will provide opportunities to think through research questions, theoretical frameworks, methodologies, and all the important sections that make up a thesis. It will also offer suggestions for how to structure and plan your own thesis proposal.

 
  • 01 June
  • 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
  • Online
The thesis proposal is an important step in the research process and can help both masters and doctoral students clarify their goals, questions, methods, and timeline. The thesis proposal is a road map to your research, and understanding how to effectively write and structure a thesis proposal can be a critical part of the research process.

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to some of the different kinds of thesis proposals and encouraged to consider how their research fits into these guides. The workshop will provide opportunities to think through research questions, theoretical frameworks, methodologies, and all the important sections that make up a thesis. It will also offer suggestions for how to structure and plan your own thesis proposal.

 
  • 19 October
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online

Programming languages


Are you curious about coding, have a project in mind and don’t know where to start or think developing fundamental knowledge about programming can be helpful? In this workshop, we will use Python, a very popular, powerful, yet simple programming language to discuss and demonstrate foundational coding concepts.

You do not need any prior knowledge of coding or Python to participate in this workshop. If you are already familiar with coding or Python, then this workshop will be too basic for you and you should not attend.

You will receive an email prior to the workshop with instructions for installing Python and Pycharm on your personal computer. You will also have access to a Moodle course page.

  • 29 September - 13 October
  • 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Online

Are you curious about coding, have a project in mind and don’t know where to start or think developing fundamental knowledge about programming can be helpful? In this workshop, we will use Python, a very popular, powerful, yet simple programming language to discuss and demonstrate foundational coding concepts.

You do not need any prior knowledge of coding or Python to participate in this workshop. If you are already familiar with coding or Python, then this workshop will be too basic for you and you should not attend.

You will receive an email prior to the workshop with instructions for installing Python and Pycharm on your personal computer. You will also have access to a Moodle course page.

  • 26 October - 09 November
  • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Online